Judaism

 

Sweet hymns and songs will I indite
To sing of Thee by day and night,
Of Thee who art my soul's delight

How doth my soul within me yearn
Beneath thy shadow to return,
Thy secret mysteries to learn.

Thy glory shall my discourse be,
In images I picture Thee,
Although myself I cannot see.

In mystic utterances alone,
By prophet and by seer made known,
Hast Thou Thy radiant glory shown.

My meditation day and night,
May it be pleasant in Thy sight,
for Thou art all my soul's delight.

selections from "Hymn of Glory"
as quoted in "Judaism" by Isidore Epstein

 

Basic Teachings of Kabbalah

" Kabbalah teaches that the universe began not with an atom or a subatomic particle, but with a thought of God. This thought of creation encompassed a world in which every human being would enjoy total happiness and fulfillment, free from any form of chaos or pain. This is what the Creator desires and intends.

For us to manifest complete fulfillment, we need to evolve into our greatest selves. In our thoughts, feelings, and actions, we need to erase negativity and replace darkness with Light. It is for this purpose that the teachings and tools of Kabbalah were given to all humanity—and the greatest of these tools is The Zohar.

Kabbalah teaches that in order for us to claim the gifts we were created to receive, we must first earn those gifts. We earn them by undertaking our spiritual work — the process of fundamentally transforming ourselves. By helping us recognize the sources of negativity in our own minds and hearts, Kabbalah gives us the tools for positive change.

Kabbalah teaches that every human being is a work in progress. Any pain, disappointment, or chaos that exists in our lives is not because this is how life is meant to be, but only because we have not yet finished the work that brought us here. That work, quite simply, is the process of freeing ourselves from the domination of the human ego and creating an affinity with the sharing essence of God.

In everyday life, this transformation means letting go of anger, jealousy, and other reactive behaviors in favor of patience, empathy, and compassion. It does not mean giving up all desire and going to live on a mountaintop. On the contrary, it means desiring more of the fulfillment that humanity was meant to have."

excerpt from the site "The Kabbalah Centre"
www.kabbalah.com