Unitarian Thought

 

 

"Faith asks us to be open to life, to participate fully in life
as it unfolds before us, even in the midst
of uncertainty and turmoil."


the late Marjorie Bowens-Wheatley, Minister


The Principles of the Unitarian Universalist Association

We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote

* The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
* Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
* Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
* A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
* The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
* The goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all;
* Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

The living tradition which we share draws from many sources:

* Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which   moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold   life;
* Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and   structures of evil with justice, compassion and the transforming power of love;
* Wisdom from the world's religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life;
* Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God's love by loving our   neighbors as ourselves;
* Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of   science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit;
* Spiritual teachings of Earth-centered traditions which celebrate the sacred circle of life and   instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature.

We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote
* The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
* Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
* Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
* A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
* The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and   in society at large;
* The goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all;
* Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

The living tradition which we share draws from many sources:
* Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which   moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold   life;
* Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and   structures of evil with justice, compassion and the transforming power of love;
* Wisdom from the world's religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life;
* Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God's love by loving our   neighbors as ourselves;
* Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of   science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit;
* Spiritual teachings of Earth-centered traditions which celebrate the sacred circle of life and   instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature.

 

Christian Unitarianism

Unitarian Christianity is a form of Unitarianism that promotes the teachings and example of Jesus Christ, as found in the New Testament. Unitarian Christians believe that the exemplar model of how men and women should live was lived by Jesus of Nazareth, who was a man and a prophet of God. Unitarian Christianity encourages open-minded, freethinking views of God, Jesus, the world and purpose of life as revealed through reason, scholarship, science, philosophy, scripture and other prophets and religions.

Unitarian Christians believe that reason and belief are complementary and that religion and science can co-exist and guide them in their understanding of nature and God. Unitarian Christians would be considered Rationalist Unitarians in terms of the various schools of thought of Unitarianism. Unitarian Christians follow the teachings and example of Jesus Christ and view him in the same regard as Jews view Moses and Muslims regard the Prophets Mohammed and Jesus.